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CAJUNS, CREOLES, PIRATES AND PLANTERS

Your New Louisiana Ancestors Format

Volume 2, Number 38

 

By Damon Veach

FROM LE COMITE: The December issue of Le Raconteur rounds out another year of publishing quality genealogical material by Le Comité des Archives de la Louisiane.  The large size of the annual index limits the number of pages available for new articles.  But, long-time editor Judy Riffel has found a way to make up for this by including a number of short articles on a wide variety of topics.

Here’s a sampling from this issue: Iberville County Court Docket Book, 1805-1807; Death of Captain Cyrus Williams, 1810; West Feliciana Parish, Parish Court Judicial Proceedings, 1821-1826; The Ogden Family of Waddington, New York, and New Orleans, 1842; Washington, St. Landry Parish Elected Officials, 1865-1986; Extracts From The Sugar Planter, West Baton Rouge Parish, 1887; Union Parish Delinquent Licenses, 1893-1894; and a continuing installment of St. Bernard Catholic Cemetery #2, Breaux Bridge, Louisiana.  This issue’s popular Computer Corner segment takes a look at photo sharing on the web, particularly by archival institutions.  A list of 2010 acquisitions at the Louisiana State Archives is also included.  This is important because the State Archives’ database of holdings is not accessible online.

In addition to being the genealogical support group for the State Archives, Le Comité’s focus is on education, particularly through publishing.  Numerous articles regarding historical and genealogical records and archival preservation make Le Raconteur stand out from the crowd.  This is not a genealogical publication that concentrates on compiled genealogies or individual family histories.  Rather, it deals with original records that genealogists use to research their families.

Memberships in Le Comité for 2010 are still available through December 31, 2010.  After that date, single issues of Le Raconteur will be available for sale until supplies run out.  To join for 2010 and receive the four issues for the year, send $20 to Le Comité, P.O. Box 1547, Baton Rouge, LA 70821.  To join for 2011, send $15 before March 1st.  After that date, a $5 late fee is imposed to pay for mailing back issues.  Members with e-mail also receive the society’s electronic newsletter, E-Communiqué, and discounts on society publications.

For a membership application, list of back issues, and publications available for sale, visit the society’s website at www.lecomite.org.

If you are looking for a last-minute gift item for Christmas, don’t forget to consider the publications of Le Comite.  One of the most ideal ones for a genealogical friend is A Guide to Genealogical Research at the Louisiana State Archives.  This one is a soft-cover book and contains 164 pages of useful information covered in 12 chapters.  It is another excellent compilation from Judy Riffel with five appendices and a subject index.  It is only $34, but Le Comite members only pay $24, a great incentive for joining this group.  There are other publications to consider for your gift list this year, so check the rest out on their web site.

XXX

CHURCH HISTORY: I often recall the work of Father Donald J. Hebert.  Anyone researching early records in South Louisiana will run across his books and other writings.  Now there is another book being released by Claitor’s Publishing that will further the knowledge of his work in the field of genealogy.  This one is called L’Eglise du Marais Bouleur, 1872-1991, History of the Church at Marais Bouler, Mire, Louisiana Order Now

One of the reasons Father Hebert did this book was to record a history that was about to be (and was) destroyed.  The old church was built at Bayou Queue de Tortue, south of Rayne.  The parish had no funds for a restoration project, and it was finally purchased by a family who wanted the lumber to build their new home in Mire.

Marais Bouleur was the name given to this small settlement, and various spellings have been recorded.  The church of Marais Bouleur (Mire) developed gradually, and its development is told with a caring look into the past of this area.  The first part of the book looks at the main events that cover the years from 1872 to 1991, and then a complete look at the Catholic Church in Louisiana is discussed.   This book is divided into several sections and covers the missions of the Grand Coteau Jesuits, the church at Bayou Queue de Tortue (which covers the pastors here), a thorough look at Marais Bouleur Mission (with a history of the community), and concludes with a look at the more recent pastors in Assumption Parish.

This book is indexed and well documented.  It is filled with the names of early resident and is an outstanding addition to any major genealogical library.  The price is $75 and available only at Claitor’s Publishing. Order Now

XXX

CHEROKEE CITIZENSHIP:  Following the signing of the Treaty of New Echota and the final removal of the bulk of the Eastern Cherokee to the Indian [Oklahoma] Territory in 1839, one of the irksome problems confronting Cherokee leaders concerned qualification for tribal citizenship. Prior to the American Civil War, this controversy was often associated with the political rivalry between the Ross and Watie factions of the relocated Cherokee. After the war the issue was exacerbated by the influx of even more white and ex-slave "intruders" to the reservation seeking the privileges of Cherokee citizenship. To make matters worse, the Cherokee Tribal Council and the Department of Interior were never able to agree on (1) who was responsible for removing "intruders," and (2) which jurisdiction had the final authority on the subject of citizenship. Despite the efforts to the contrary of Chief Ochalata and the Cherokee Tribal Council during the administrations of Presidents Grant and Hayes, the citizenship question was one factor leading to the passage of the Dawes Severalty Act of 1887. This statute resulted in the denationalization of the Cherokee and other tribes in the Indian Territory and the establishment of a white-dominated government in Oklahoma.

The book at hand, the second in a series, concerns the rulings of the Cherokee Nation Commission on Citizenship (a creation of the Tribal Council) on cases of citizenship. (It should be noted that the Dawes Commission of 1893 subsequently scrutinized the Cherokee Commission dockets in making its final determinations on citizenship for members of the Five Civilized Tribes.) Cherokee Commission Dockets 1880-1884 and 1887-1889, Volume II consists of abstracts of Dockets 287-718 of the Commission. Besides the names of the applicant and the presiding commissioners and the date of the determination, in most instances the transcriptions identify the names of family members and their relationship to the person(s) filing the application. In all, researchers will find references to about 4,000 Cherokee claimants in this volume, bringing the total identified to date to about 8,000.

The book is available from Clearfield Press, 3600 Clipper Mill Road, Suite 260, Baltimore, MD 21211, and the price including shipping and handling is $40.50.  You can also check out their other books at www.genealogical.com.   You may also want to check out the first volume in this series too.

The Genealogical Publishing Company (same address) is also a part of this publishing group, and they recently released another title that may be of interest to researchers.  It’s called Erin’s Sons: Irish Arrivals in Atlantic Canada to 1863.  This is the fourth volume and sells for $35.50, postpaid.

Citing an additional 7,000 Irish-born residents of Atlantic Canada, Volume IV of Erin's Sons: Irish Arrivals in Atlantic Canada brings the coverage of this ground-breaking work forward to 1863, the mid-point of the American Civil War. By that year, Irish immigration into Atlantic Canada had diminished almost to a trickle, as ever bigger and faster steam ships allowed immigrants to set out for the more distant factory towns of New England and various points in the American West.

The Irish-born population of Atlantic Canada peaked in the early 1860s; after that the combination of out-migration to the United States and “upper Canada,” the reduction in Irish immigration, and the influx of non-Irish elements began the proportionate decline of the Irish in the population. Volume IV, therefore, rounds off the series at the turning point in the decline of the Irish-born population.

Like the other volumes in the series, Volume IV contains extracts of data from a wide range of sources, chiefly public records, newspapers, and cemetery records. Probably as much or even more than the other volumes, records of marriages and deaths and census records predominate, while there are the usual out-of-the-way records of ships’ passengers, runaways, deserters, and old soldiers. Once again, the fourth volume of Erin’s Sons offers a wealth of data that is generally inaccessible to the average researcher, identifying Irish-born individuals in every kind of record in which immigrants to Atlantic Canada are named.

XXX

FREE SERVICE:  Correspondence to this column should be directed to Damon Veach, Cajuns, Creoles, Pirates and Planters, 709 Bungalow Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70802-5337.  The e-mail address is ancestorslaveach@cox.net.  Queries and book reviews are printed as space permits, and you are encouraged to take advantage of this free service.  Claitor’s Publishing can serve as a distributor for self-published genealogy titles.  Go to their homepage for details on how you can obtain this excellent service.

 

 




 

Antoine Blanc,
1792-1860
by William L Greene $35.00
Details/Order

 


 

Acadians in Exile
1700-1825
by Rev. Donald Hebert
$75.00
Details/Order


 

Louisiana Families
in Southeast Texas
1840-1940
by Rev. Donald Hebert
$60.00
Details/Order


 

German Coast Families:
European Orgins and
Settlement in Colonial
Louisiana
by Albert J. Robichaux, Jr
$65.00
Details/Order

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

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