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CAJUNS, CREOLES, PIRATES AND PLANTERS

Your New Louisiana Ancestors Format

Volume 2, Number 2

 

By Damon Veach

 

PRESERVING RECORDS:  FamilySearch is constantly updating and completing projects of great concern for genealogical researchers.  New this past week was the first indexing projects for Portugal and the Isle of Man. Also of note is a new sign-in process for FamilySearch Indexing. Beginning this week, indexers will need to create a free FamilySearch Account, which will provide the convenience of using just one user name and password for all FamilySearch Web sites.  You can learn more about this by going to www.FamilySearch.org.

 

Recently completed projects that will be online soon are:  Argentina, Balvanera - Registros Parroquiales 1833-1934 (Part A); Canada, British Columbia—Deaths, 1872–1986 (Part 4); Jamaica—Civil Births, 1878–1899 (Part A); Norway—1875 Census (Part 1); U.S., Florida—1910 Federal Census; U.S., Georgia—1910 Federal Census; U.S., Indiana, Clark County—Marriages, 1811–1959; U.S., Indiana, Dubois County—Marriages, 1811–1959; U.S., Indiana, Harrison County—Marriages, 1811–1959; U.S., Maryland—1910 Federal Census; U.S., Montana—1910 Federal Census; and U.S., Tennessee—County Marriages, 1790–1950 (Part A).

 

Many new project have just started this past week, including records from Guatemala, Italy (Trento), Jamaica, Portugal (Setubal), U.K. – Isle of Man, Indiana (Daviess and Delaware counties – marriages),  Puerto Rico (Nacimientos Civiles, 1836-1930, Part A), and 1910 census records for Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, and New Jersey.

 

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at www.FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

XXX

 

INDIAN NAMES: Sometimes in reviewing books and even novels, there are times when the need or desire is to go back and re-read for gaining some important data or just for pleasure.  Both need and pleasure took me back to Louisiana Place Names of Indian Origin, A Collection of Words. Once I checked out what I needed in my research problem, I ended up reading the entire book again.  The last time I did this was in connection to information from the Natchitoches area, so I took out No Man’s Land and again re-read it.  For some reason, I have held onto these books as I have several others because I felt there might be a need for further study in their contents.  They will eventually be donated to the Veach-Foshee Memorial Library Collection in Mansfield, Louisiana at the Mansfield Female College Museum, but as of now, I continue to have use for them.

 

The Indian volume is interesting in the fact that I needed some Choctaw information that I thought might be found here.  One of my ancestors was a full-blood Choctaw named Martha Moore and according to census records she was born in Missouri.  She married Wyatt Woodruff Adams of Sevier County, Arkansas who brought his family to Panola County, Texas, located adjacent to DeSoto Parish.  Much of my ancestry is connected to these two areas.

 

I had forgotten how important the life of William A. Read was, so I had a re-learning experience here.  The latest edition of this volume was edited with an introduction by George M. Riser and published by The University of Alabama Press.  Read was born in 1869 in Virginia, four years after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox and died ninety three years later in 1962.  He was an internationally educated and renowned linguist whose career included 38 years as a professor of English at Louisiana State University.  His writings spanned five decades and have been instrumental across a wide range of academic disciplines.  Most importantly, Read devoted a good portion of his research to the meaning of place names in the southeastern United States, especially as they related to Indian word adoption by Europeans.

 

 

This volume includes Read’s three Louisiana articles combined:  Louisiana: Louisiana Place-Names of Indian Origin (1927), More Indian Place-Names in Louisiana (1928), and Indian Words (1931).   Thus it is that this volume completes the re-publication of his southern place name writings.  Indian Places Names in Alabama, Florida Place Names of Indians and Seminole Personal Names.  Complete with maps and extensive documentation, this is one book that serves a dual purpose for obtaining important dates and facts to sheer reading pleasure.

 

XXX

 

GOING STRONG: With the release of the March issue of “Le Raconteur,” this society publication of Le Comite des Archives de la Louisiane enters year thirty, and the organization is slightly older but only a few months until things could get organized.  I guess I should recall this since I started the organization while working with then Archivist Donald Lemieux and Secretary of State Paul Hardy.  It was formed at their request to provide positive support for the State Archives, and this is what the organization has done all these years.  It is now one of the strongest groups in the nation and continues to constantly blaze a trail of important accomplishments through its leadership and it commitment to the preservation of Louisiana’s important records.

 

“Le Raconteur” continues to forge new interests in those documents that are most likely unavailable to most researchers.  Through the expertise of treasurer Judy Riffel and assistance by membership chairman Anne Riffel, the group membership hovers around 600 individuals each year.  The one thing that is most notable about all this is that the membership fees are the same as they were those thirty or so years ago.  That is the sign of proper management and expert investments in a less than desirable marketplace. 

 

Being online now has helped considerably, and they also issue a periodic newsletter in addition to their quarterly publication.  Here again, the number of pages in the publication has increased so more data is being presented to researchers and thus preserving it for future generations to enjoy.  Even the layout in the quarterly shows how much work goes into not only the compiling but the actual field work of those individuals who donate their time to copying the records and proofing them for accuracy.  Most subscribers never think of all the work involved, but all this is done for only $15 per year.  It is an amazing story of growth through management skills of all those in charge of the group, and much of this can be attributed to the Riffels.

 

If you want to learn more about Le Comite (as it is commonly called), contact the treasurer (and also the publications editor) at riffelj@bellsouth.net.   You may also want to check the web site at http://www.lecomite.org/.  You will find a wealth of material here.

 

 

 




 

Antoine Blanc,
1792-1860
by William L Greene $35.00
Details/Order

 


 

Acadians in Exile
1700-1825
by Rev. Donald Hebert
$75.00
Details/Order


 

Louisiana Families
in Southeast Texas
1840-1940
by Rev. Donald Hebert
$60.00
Details/Order


 

German Coast Families:
European Orgins and
Settlement in Colonial
Louisiana
by Albert J. Robichaux, Jr
$65.00
Details/Order

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

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